Manuel Lieras obituary photo
 
In Memory of

Manuel Lieras

August 31, 1934 - October 5, 2016

Obituary


Manuel Lieras, from San Diego, CA was born on August 31, 1934 and went to be with our Lord on October 5, 2016, at the age of 82. He was proud to have grown up in Lemon Grove.

He was proceeded in death by his father Rosario Lieras, his mother Domitila Gonzales Nunez; his brothers: Frank Nunez, Gonzalo Nunez, Louie Lieras, Rudolfo Lieras, grandson Damian Fine, wife Audrey, and their daughters Elise and Gianna. He often spoke of his family who had passed because he loved and missed them all very much.

Manuel Lieras, from San Diego, CA was born on August 31, 1934 and went to be with our Lord on October 5, 2016, at the age of 82. He was proud to have grown up in Lemon Grove.

He was proceeded in death by his father Rosario Lieras, his mother Domitila Gonzales Nunez; his brothers: Frank Nunez, Gonzalo Nunez, Louie Lieras, Rudolfo Lieras, grandson Damian Fine, wife Audrey, and their daughters Elise and Gianna. He often spoke of his family who had passed because he loved and missed them all very much.

Manuel was known by many other names, Bevie, Tata, Tots, Tio Bevie, Uncle Bevie, and Manny (by his co-workers many years ago). He left behind his loving wife Rosie (married 32 years); one son, Louie and six daughters: Vicky (husband Gilbert); Linda (husband Joe); Sandra (boyfriend Al); Dona (husband Perry); Roylyn (husband Doug); and Pati (husband Tom). He was blessed with twenty-one grandchildren (most of whom are married which greatly increases this number), fifty-four great-grandchildren, and one great-great grandchild. He also had many God-sons and God-daughters, nephews, nieces, cousins and friends. He loved everyone and he was greatly loved in return.

Tata was dedicated to his family. He was the first person to hold Roylyn's daughter Chrystal's first baby, and waited at the hospital for many grandkids to be born. He also attended many of their school and sporting events. He helped raise Damian, Louito and Rocky; baby-sat Vicky, Connie, Cece and many of the other grandkids at one time or another; and as adults some of the kids and grandkids lived with him and Nana.

Bevie was a big kid and he was proud he could carry two golf bags at one time to earn money as a caddy at a golf course in Lemon Grove. When he was in 10th grade he "quituated," as he would say, from Grossmont High School and went to work at Hunter's Nursery. He later worked at Convair as a forklift driver, and retired from Boise Cascade as a lumber yard maintenance worker. Bevie was forced into early retirement when an injury to his foot would not heal. That's when he found out he was Diabetic. He was told by the doctor to quit drinking beer, quit smoking and quit eating sweets. He left the doctor appointment, went to the bar "Good Guys" in Lemon Grove and got drunk one last time; before giving up alcohol, cigarettes, and sweets for the rest of his life. He'd tell us that's why he lived as long as he did. After he retired he enjoyed working in the yard and every year he planted tomatoes and zucchini. When his family would visit he would say, "do you have your green card? I need pickers." Although Bevie lost his eyesight in one eye and eventually became legally blind in the other, it didn't stop him from working in the yard. In recent years, when planting tomatoes was too hard for him, he was grateful that Roylyn visited from Alaska so that she and Dona could plant tomatoes for him. When his eyesight and congestive heart failure worsened he would sit on the grass and pull weeds, and was proud to tell you the amount of recycle bins he filled. Bevie loved to work.

Tata loved to tell stories whether they were true or fictional. He was very proud of the fact he didn't start drinking until age 21. He hung out at several bars in Lemon Grove: The Good Guys, Pals, Sportsman and the HorseShoe. He was very good at playing pool and won many tournaments. He used to tell the grandkids he invented the game of pool. He also loved playing golf and camping at Clam beach in Mexico every holiday weekend with much of the family. He lived in Alaska for several years with his first wife Jan and he liked to fish. Him and his wife Rosie (Nana) traveled to Georgia by bus to visit their daughter Sandra and her husband Ray. Tata and Nana loved taking trips to play slot machines in Reno and Las Vegas, Nevada. Tata watched a lot of cowboy movies and was a fan of Gene Autry. He enjoyed giving his loved ones Twinkies or chocolate bars on their birthdays. For Christmas he enjoyed wrapping up chocolate candy bars for his daughters and adult granddaughters, and toys for Santa to give to the grandkids. Tata loved watching the kids playing happily with their new toys.

Tata was proud that his grandkids were raised well and that he didn't have to spank them in the 'Whipper Room' for bad behavior; instead he was able to joke around and play with the kids. He had many expressions he was known for like: "I'm going to the Good Guys", or "He or she went to the Good Guys," "Eat your chicken so you can run real fast," "I'll break your bony legs," and "I'm going to Alabama" or "He or she went to Alabama?" He would tell us gave Sunny (their cat who he called Red Eye) $5 so he can go to TJ, and when the black cat was in the yard he would say, "Sunny is out with La Prieta".

He would also say funny things like he was going to have a 40 lb. bean burrito for Thanksgiving. He loved eating beans. Instead of ordering other food on the menu at Cotijas, he would order a bean burrito. When visiting Tata & Nana if you wanted more food, he would say "four cents" as if you had to pay .04 cents to have more food. He said that phrase because when he was a teenager he and his brothers and friends were at the Ace Drive-In in Lemon Grove they were ordering something to eat and drink and the person joked around with them that they had to pay .04 cents to have extra. After finishing his food, he always said, "gracias a Dios" like his mama taught him.

He told us many stories of growing up in Lemon Grove. He said his teacher told him to walk the girls home from school so the bullies would leave them alone because he was a big kid and the other boys were scared of him. When he was older he rebuilt his cars into hot rods and enjoyed racing them.

When driving Tata to a store or a doctor's appointment he would tell you what used to be at a particular spot in Lemon Grove or other areas of San Diego 60 to 70 years ago. He loved the color red, and would tell you to get a red one or he wanted a red this or that whenever he had a chance. He was happy that Hospice brought a red wheel chair and couldn't wait to use it.

He would tell you what the weather was going to be like, and he was also happy to tell the roofers that live across the street when it was going to rain so they wouldn't have to go to work. He would tell us the story that on Fridays, he would tell his co-workers, "I wish it was Monday so I can go back to work." He would say, "they were all buddy buddy with me" "they all liked me." He used to tell us, "go to work so you can rest." Or "did you make supervisor yet?" And then tell the story, that he asked Cece if she made supervisor, she said, "no, not yet Tata" so he said, "well quit then," and he said she did, he would laugh. I think he made up that story.

In regards to mail, he would say, "did my check come" or if we got mail at the house he would say "you got a check here." He used to count the days until he seen us and he would tell you how many days left until your birthday. If someone was taking a shower or bath he would say, "oh they think its Saturday".

Sophia remembers when Tata asked the kids how old are they, he would tell them they were a year younger because they were sick one year. When babysitting he'd tease the kids when they saw cookies or chips in the house, he used to say, "don't look at them," but then of course give them some. If you didn't want a soda when offered one, he would say, "oh you're driving?" He would ask the kids even the boys, "you want a dolly for your birthday?" And he would tell them, "I wish you were a monkey". When you told Tata how old your little kid was he would say, "oh, they're smoking now?" He would tease the kids by saying, "go to the whipper room." Tata laughed when he told the story about Gilly wanting to go to the "whipper room" not knowing what it was. He would also say, "aye hombre," or "I'm going to break your boney legs," or "come hear so I can pinch you." He'd say "I'm going to throw a rock at you," or "I'm going to pop you one." He called the kids, "Muskie" or he would say to a pregnant granddaughter, "name your baby, Muskie?" Melena, however, did not name her first born son Muskie, she named him Manuel after Tata and calls him "Manny". Tata would also call the kids "Hoolagans." And when he couldn't remember someone's name he would call the girls "la mijita." He would say, "I like Ashlie or I like Teresa, she's a nice girl."

He used to remember taking Jay or Damian for a walk to the store to get a soda and donut, and taking all the grandkids (not all at once of course) to Burger King or McDonalds, and the time he took Elisa for a walk and had to cash his check at Rock Liquor so he can buy her the pair of shoes she saw at Payless. When Johnny, Rosie, Marcy or Frances didn't go to school, he'd say, "you didn't go to school, why, you didn't have socks?" When leaving a party from Olive Street he would say they had to leave so Nana could iron his socks. To his sons-in-law and nephews: Joe, Gilbert, Frankie, Bobby, David and Johnny, he would say hi by saying, "ey boy" (b is said soft like a w).

He took care of his mom and dad, and recently he told us several times that his mom said, "when you are old you will have daughters who will take care of you," and he said it came true that we did take good care of him. And when we helped him he'd say, "thank you sweet heart."

When baby-sitting Tata would tell the kids "I'm watching you like a hawk." And we know he is still doing so because the day Tata passed away Connie and Vicky were leaving the hospital and all of a sudden they seen a red hawk, it was flying close, they could see how huge it was, immediately they remembered Tata saying "I'm watching you like a hawk." So this we know, he will continue to watch over us all like a hawk.

Bevie was a loving husband, he did not want mom to be alone, he held on until the morning after Louie moved in. In the middle of the night he was singing, whistling and snapping his fingers so this we know he was already celebrating with his brothers and family on Lester and Olive Street in heaven. His spirit lives on forever with Jesus, and he will continue to watch over us all like a hawk. He will truly be missed.

Eternal rest grant unto Manuel, O Lord.
And let perpetual light shine upon his.
May he rest in peace. Amen.
May his soul and the souls of all the faithfully departed, through the mercy of God, Rest in Peace. Amen.